Iguana on the plate

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Last night Danish televion made a big fuss about the Nicaraguan governtment’s proposal for the population to eat iguanas to prevent starvation. It started a discussion about wird food proposals in third world countries.

I found this strange since I am of the impression that it is rather normal to eat iguanas in Nicaragua. The men on the photo showed me some they were going to eat, and I saw many iguana vendors along the panamerican highway. I was told it was a delicacy, but illigal.

My impression was confirmed by El Nuevo Diario. The paper writes underlines that the governtment wants people to raise iguanas instead of catching them. Catching them in the wild is illigal. This can besides food generate an income for the iguana-raiser by selling the skin or selling iguanas as pets. The proposal has come forward because the country is experiencing draught.

http://www.elnuevodiario.com.ni/nacionales/326950-gobierno-recomienda-criar-iguanas-enfrentar-sequia

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the taste of Nicaragua

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It has been three months since I left Nicaragua, and I am starting to crave beans, rice and eggs with cheese on the side.

It is not the fanciest dish I can think of, but it carries many memories.

In Nicaragua this meal was served as breakfast, lunch and dinner, therefore eating it is a big part of living in the country.

I had to change the ingredients a bit, because they cannot be found in Denmark, and furthermore I had to count on the internet since none has passed the recipes on to me. However, the result was satisfying.

2 persons

Gallo Pinto:

1½ dl kidney beans (soaked in water overnight)

1/4 onion

1½ clove of garlic

½ tablespoon salt

boil the ingredients for about 1 hour

remove the water

fry the beans in some oil, add more garlic or onion if you like

add boiled rice for two

add 2 tablespoons of balsamic vinegar

adjust with salt and pepper

eggs:

4 eggs

½ onion

2 cloves of garlic

bell peber

scample the ingreedients

cheese: I used feta

I served it with iceberg, cherry tomatoes and bell pepper, but in Nicaragua the salad would typically be made of finely chopped white cabbage or tomatoes